OpsLens

The Scary Future of Our Economy

With the economic uncertainty we see today, I found one of the most disturbing pieces of information recently.
According to CNBC, economic experts report the millennial generation, my generation, is set to become one of the wealthiest generations in history.

Are you kidding me?

The rise of the millennial generation has captured the attention of economists and analysts worldwide. While this development can promise numerous benefits, it also raises concerns about its potential impact on the economy.

We all know that YouTube blogger or video game “influencer” making millions by having subscribers while playing games. This of course makes us re-evaluate our 9-5 work schedule, while also questioning our life decisions, but is it only the beginning?

The millennial generation faces a unique set of circumstances that have shaped their wealth accumulation. Factors such as advancements in technology, access to education, and changing social norms have contributed to their financial success. The rise of the gig economy and entrepreneurship has also allowed millennials to generate wealth through non-traditional means. This alone changes the landscape of wealth opportunities.

At the same time, economic experts report a transition of wealth generationally (inheritance) of near $90 trillion in assets over the next decade.

Can you imagine?

The first generation to receive the participation trophy. The generation to see a major increase in helicopter parenting, and even started getting the snowplow parenting (look it up if you’re not familiar). The first major generation refusing to work a 9-5 job because it “restricts the creative energies for their passion”, and started the concept of “bare minimum Mondays” at work because they don’t want to make money “for the evil corporation”. The same generation advocating for student loan forgiveness because they can’t afford a living after the student loan repayments begin. In fact, largely because of this generation, we see the highest rate of credit card debt and personal home debt due to keeping up with quality living standards during a time of insane inflation, because we refuse to downsize or cut back.

This is the generation set to receive the largest inheritance, and become the wealthiest of anyone before them.

Obviously that is a very generalized description of an entire generation, but we have seen the strongest push back of society’s general acceptance of a work ethic from us. We’ve also seen the least amount of investment in retirement, starting small businesses, investing in the stock market, etc., from this generation. In fact, according to money.com, only 9.5% of millennials have started saving for retirement.

So here’s the big question:

If the millennials aren’t planning retirement, starting businesses, or investing, what will happen to all this wealth?

With decades of hard work and investment, building the nation’s economy through small business and capitalist growth now being handed over to us, what do we do with it?

Traditionally us millennials are known for lavish world tour vacations, working to be the next big video game expert, or starting the trend of the avocado latte. But as we age, we’ve finally decided to accept the fact we are considered adults now, but still do not seem to be interested in starting families, buying homes, or settling down. I mean we are the generation of “YOLO” right?

So what does this all mean?

What will happen to one of the largest economies in the world when all these assets and all this wealth lands in our laps? Will we pick up where our parents and grandparents left off to continue to grow wealth and success?

Or will we see the largest one time spending spree in the economic history to artificially boost economic growth, only to see it collapse shortly after when we’ve had our fun? Will we see all the hard work of past generations wasted on a one time “personal experience” with traveling and adventure?

Could we see the most influential negative impact on the US economy from a single generation that continues to ride the gravy train of bailouts and participation trophies?